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Ethos & Values

LEARNing Skills

Through our LEARNing, our aim is to support children in exploring their learning through awe and wonder.

At St Joseph’s, our curriculum is underpinned by these skills, driving forward challenge and support as appropriate and enabling children to articulate their learning through metacognition. 

We define our LEARNing skills under resilience, reflectiveness, collaborationcuriosity and independence.

Resilience

Children:

Children are encouraged to keep on trying, showing determination when faced with challenges.

We take time to learn from mistakes and will try something another way.

Staff:

Model resilience by demonstrating positive attitude, growth mindset and perseverance. Staff are solution focused in their practice, modelling focus and support of one another showing patience and encouragement. We foster a culture of taking risks in our learning and celebrate learning which has require resilience.

Reflectiveness

Children:

Children recognise and value their own and each others achievements. We actively encourage learning from our mistakes to inform future learning. We take time to reflect on what has gone well and what needs change. We engage in spiritual reflectiveness that underpins the Catholic Ethos of the school We gather as a class, year group, key stage or school to reflect on how we can live out the Gospel and British values.

Staff:

Provide opportunities to reflect upon children’s learning. Staff participate in school and staff reflections when gathered as a group. We celebrate children’s achievements and use the THRIVE approach to reflect upon how we can best support children’s needs.

Collaboration

Children:

Children are responsible for their own actions, belongings and their environment to enhance their learning. Children access available resources and adhere to clearly established routines. Children try ‘3 before me’ when learning (book, buddy, board).

Staff:

Staff care for one another and support each other. We share good practice, inspirations, ideas, resources and planning. Staff promote a positive outlook through getting involved, feeling values and working towards shared goals.

Curiosity

Children:

Children feel safe in school to take risks in their learning. They ask questions to extend their learning. We look for links across the curriculum to understand ow topics link to one another in our own year group and from our prior learning. Children always try their best and show a willingness to learn.

Staff:

Staff use stunning starts and fabulous finishes to inspire an inquisitiveness and about learning. Awe and wonder is at the centre of our teaching. Staff provide an environment that inspires children to come to school. We get involved with new projects and initiatives.

Independence

Children:

Children are encouraged to live out the Golden Rule, treating others with kindness and respect by following the pledge. Children learn and play cooperatively together, sharing equipment and resources. Children promote Gospel Values as a St Joseph’s family and are encouraged to take responsibility for their environment.

Staff:

Staff support independence by celebrating and adapting to differences. We provide appropriate differentiation and assessment with well-planned and appropriately resourced lessons. Staff are confident individuals who are prepared to tackle new initiatives and are open to change and new ways of learning.

Spirituality, Prayer & Collective Worship

Spirituality at St. Joseph's Catholic Primary School

We believe that Christian worship in a Catholic school is concerned with giving glory, honour, praise and thanks to God. It is our loving response, in words and actions, to God’s invitation to enter into relationship, made possible through the work of Jesus Christ and the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.

British Values

The teaching of values and moral development form an important part of pupil’s holistic development and help them prepare for life in modern Britain. The RE curriculum includes:

Mutual Tolerance

Respectful Attitudes

Democracy

The Rule of Law

Individual Liberty

Mutual Tolerance

Schools do not accept intolerant attitudes to members of the community; attitudes which reject other people on the basis of race, faith, gender, sexual orientation or age are really challenged. A baseline for a fair community is that each person’s right to ‘be themselves’ is to be accepted by all. Tolerance may not be enough: RE can challenge children and young people to be increasingly respectful and to celebrate diversity, but tolerance is a starting point. It is much better than intolerance.

Respectful Attitudes

In the RE curriculum attention focuses on developing mutual respect between those of different faith and beliefs, promoting an understanding of what a society gains from diversity. Pupils will learn about diversity in religious and worldviews, and will be challenged to respect other persons who see the world differently to themselves. Recognition and celebration of human diversity in many forms can flourish where pupils understand different faiths and beliefs, and are challenged to be broad minded and open hearted.

Democracy

In RE pupils learn the significance of each person’s ideas and experiences through methods of discussions. In debating the fundamental questions of life, pupils learn to respect a range of perspectives. This contributes to learning about democracy, examining the idea that we all share a responsibility to use our voice and influence for the wellbeing of others.

Rule of Law

In RE pupils examine different examples of codes for human life, including commandments, rules or precepts offered by different religious communities. They learn to appreciate how individuals choose between good and evil, right and wrong, and they learn to apply these ideas to their own communities. They learn that fairness requires that the law apply equally to all, irrespective – for example – of a person’s status or wealth.

Individual Liberty

In RE, pupils consider questions about identity, belonging and diversity, learning what it means to live a life free from constrains. They study examples of pioneers of human freedom, including those from within different religions, so they can examine tensions between the value of a stable society and the value of change for human development.

For more information about the British values taught at St Joseph’s, please refer to our British Values Statement.